Applying for a mortgage is a tough decision to make, especially when you have a spouse and/or kids. There are cases when in fact it’s best to apply for a mortgage on your own. We’ll tell you all there is to know about mortgages and what helps you get your application approved, or what could get it dismissed.

Although starting a marriage and looking for a home might be a dream come true for most of us, applying for a mortgage is a rational decision to make. This takes time and ultimately, it might be smarter to apply separately for it.

So, let’s see when it’s the best time to take a mortgage without your spouse:

  • If One of You Has a Bad Credit Score

Applying for a mortgage with your spouse means that both of your credit scores will be put on display for the lender to check and compare. Unfortunately, even if one of you has an excellent score, the one with the bad credit can bring both of you down.

The bank will pay more attention to the negative score even if the other score could balance the negative one. As a general rule, it would be best for both spouses to have a medium rating, rather than big discrepancies.

  • In Case of Identity Theft

There’s nothing worse than applying for a mortgage and finding out that someone has used your name, destroyed your credit score, made many debts and, in addition, had a high credit usage.

To avoid this, check your credit score regularly. As rare as it is, identity theft is hard to prove and it also takes time to sort out the situation.

If your spouse has fallen victim to this sort of crime, but you’ve already found the perfect home, applying for a mortgage on your own is a wise decision.

  • In Case of Excessive Debt

A high credit card usage is considered to be over 20% of the current loan you’ve taken. Applying for a mortgage when your spouse’s debt has a high-income ratio might come with a denied mortgage application.

If the loan is still approved, consider that you’ll have to deal with higher interest rates, so it might be best to choose to apply on your own.

  • If There Is No Credit Score

Let’s say that maybe a person has saved money, and never had to take on a loan. From the bank’s point of view, that individual presents a risky application. By not knowing anything about his/her finances and not having any proof that the applicant is trustworthy, the bank will be skeptical in approving the loan.

Your spouse’s non-existent credit history or a short one will certainly be detrimental when applying for a mortgage.

Start by checking both of your credit scores and then talk to a mortgage specialist to give you some advice. He/she will surely tell you if it’s best to apply together, or on your own.